December 31, 2019
It seems more and more probable that major degradation of the climate as a result of the Industrial Revolution will not be entirely avoided. Though we carry on in order to avoid the burden on future generations and the rest of the living world, the time has come to look responsibly also at how to form resilient communities capable of deep adaptation in the face of collapse. This collapse is most likely to be modal rather than cataclysmic, in the near term. This week we present some resources. And some new thinking about our relationship to wildness. “In wildness is the preservation of the world.”—Henry David Thoreau
But first the news.

But first a Word About Our Table of Contents

It turns out that designers of some smartphone (and possibly other personal digital devices) have decided supporting Tables of Contents is over. That is a huge deal, but when major corporations make huge deals there is hardly anything editors can do about it (but we are looking into that!). But we will continue with the Table of Contents anyway. It seems to be popular (though maddening on devices which don’t respond to the links.) We are looking into some steps we can take to restore this capability. Meanwhile, at least readers will now have an ordered list of articles and sections (though we sprinkle the various section items around the issue, as we want to give readers a relief here and there from weighty matters). Please continue letting us know about your reading esperience by emailing editor@thebanner.news. Mention “Reader Experience” in the Subject line, that will bring it to our immediate attention. And now for the news…

Table of Contents

Activist News

Focus on Resilience & Re-wilding

Indigenous Peoples News

The Lighter Side of Things

The Current Climate

News Round-up


The Spirit of Climate Justice

For the past few months The Park Church has been in a period of contemplation and discernment about becoming a climate Justice Church. The next two events in our journey are:

  1. Spirit Cafe – focus on “The Spirit of Climate Justice.”

Friday, January 3, at 6:00 PM
The Park Church
208 W Gray St.

Elmira, NY 14901

A  home cooked meal will be prepared for you. There is a $10 suggested contribution for the meal. 
 RSVP to Diane Hughes at the church office: 607-733-9104.

  • Wisdom Calls the Beloved Community” Guest preacher Rev. Dele will focus on the topic of climate justice.

    Immediately following the service there will be a potluck luncheon after which Rev. Dele will make an interactive presentation about “Inviting mother nature to the beloved community.”

    Sunday, January 5, 10:00AM
    The Park Church
    208 W Gray St.
    Elmira, NY 14901
    You are welcome to join us for the 10:00 AM service, the potluck presentation, or both.

  • Please RSVP by emailing Doug Couchon.
    Also, bring a dish to pass and your own table service for the potluck.

Rev. Dele (pronounced del-ee) is a grandmother, author and 6th generation activist minister who is called to build resilient communities. She helps community leaders find convergence in faith, ecology and economic empowerment. She serves on the UCC Climate Council, National Congress of Black American Indians and the board of Permaculture Association of the Northeast. Dele is developing Soil & Souls as a native plant nursery that provides leadership training and community education for resilience in communities that need it most.

Dele’s M. Div. is from Howard School of Divinity and B.A. from University of California-Riverside. She has standing in the Southern Conference of the UCC, is a member of Union Chapel UCC, Burlington, NC, and maintains Baptist and Indigenous affiliations. Dele grew up in the Syracuse area and is currently living in the Hudson Valley where she is caring for her aging mother. 

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Into the Lion’s Den:Three Activists
from Extinction Rebellion Asheville, BXE and APPPL
Disrupt Major Republican Holiday Fundraiser

Early last week, a few days before the solstice we got word of an up-coming Republican Party fundraiser in honor of a former N.C. Congressman, Charles Taylor, who has connections to a failed bank and the Russian mafia. Last year about 20 of us picketed outside this event at Asheville’s upscale Crowne Plaza Resort, but were threatened with arrest and forced to leave early on. This year on the solstice evening  and in spite of the cost of tickets ($65), which some people thought would be a waste of money, Kendall and Debby Genz (another elder) and Steve went into the lions den of about 300 cultish Republican leaders and public officials. Being inside clearly gave us opportunities which did not exist outside.  Not knowing the layout of the fundraiser room or seating arrangements, not knowing how many people would be attending, not knowing what security would be like, not knowing whether we would have assigned seats, we could not create detailed plans beforehand. We knew, though, that we could be creative, bold, and steadfast, and if possible sit near the front where we could have the most impact.

Kendall Hale in the red jacket is holding one end of the banner, Steve Norris is on the other end. VIDEO: Debby Genz.

However, when we arrived, we found everyone had assigned seats, and our table was near a back corner of the room. On the table was glossy pro-Trump propaganda — “In 2020 help Trump defeat Socialism”. Worse still, across from us at our table of eight guests was a cop in uniform, with a gun on his hip, and his wife next to him. Not only did we have to make small talk with them and the other guests while we ate, but the three of us had to recalculate our plan of attack in whispers to one another. We also had to listen to uninspiring speakers applaud the incredible “historical accomplishments” of the Trump administration: Keeping out immigrants, loosening all sorts of regulations, appointing conservative judges, passing tax cuts, and so on.  The food was good, but being there was frightening and stressful; and at the same time exciting, knowing that maybe we could outwit these Republicans right under their noses. And that maybe, just maybe, if we could pull off our action, we’d turn this banal holiday party into something, for better or worse, they might remember as the most colorful and challenging event of the evening or of the holiday season.

After the dinner ended (we had to forego the cheesecake) and as the formal program was commencing, Kendall and Steve abruptly and without fanfare stood up and unfurled a banner that said “Climate Emergency, Extinction Rebellion.” Since it was too noisy to give our prepared speech, we chanted “Climate Emergency, Rebel for Life” as we walked to the front of room and across to the podium. At some point Steve said in his loudest voice “I’m sorry to interrupt you holiday festivities but my and your children and grandchildren are gravely endangered by climate change.”

Debby video-ed, while the audience weakly began to chant, “Make American Great Again” and “USA! USA! USA! USA…” in a too late attempt to drown us out. Soon after two frantic hotel security guards grabbed and pushed us out a side door warning us “You must leave the grounds immediately or be arrested”).

A friend wrote me the next day: “I would have been scared shitless. I would have expected to have been beaten. Kendall’s sure that this was her most scary action ever. But she did it anyway.,

Many activists now believe that we must take personal risks, as well as risks of arrest, if we are going to confront the challenges posed by climate change, mass extinction, and the myriad violent oppressive policies of the Trump administration. It seems fitting that during this Christmas season, celebrating rebel Jesus who as a young man disrupted the activities of the money changers in the Temple in Jerusalem, that a few of us should make the lives of these greedy and corrupt Republican zealots uncomfortable as well.—”Into the Lion’s Den: 3 Asheville XR activists disrupt 300 person Republican Party Fundraiser,” Steve Norris,  XRAsheville, 12/27/19

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Lily Tomlin arrested at D.C. climate change protest

Where there’s Grace, there’s Frankie.

On Friday, “Grace and Frankie” actress Lily Tomlin was arrested outside the Capitol building during a climate change protest led by her sitcom co-star Jane Fonda, reported Deadline.

Tomlin was among a group of protesters advocating for the federal government to rally behind the Green New Deal.

Enthused demonstrators exhorted, “Lily! Lily!” as the 80-year-old actress was arrested, her hands zip-tied together, while being led away by cops.…—”Tomlin arrested in D.C.,” Storm Gifford, New York Daily News, 12/27/19

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PennEast Pipeline Seeks More Time
for Controversial Project

Developers request extra two years to bring gas pipeline into service by Jan. 19, 2022, while they await all outstanding approvals, according to filing with FERC on Monday.

Developers request extra two years to bring gas pipeline into service by Jan. 19, 2022, while they await all outstanding approvals, according to filing with FERC on Monday.

  • PennEast says it has “worked in good faith and has used its best efforts” to obtain all required approvals needed for construction
  • Says still chasing remaining permits and clearance under National Historic Preservation Act for Pennsylvania portion of project
  • Also pursuing clearance under the NHPA and CWA Section 404 permit in New Jersey
  • PennEast says the delay won’t have any impact on public interest findings underlying the certificate order
  • NOTE: Original certificate…—”PennEast Pipeline Seeks More Time to Build Controversial Project,” Stephen Cunningham, Bloomberg|Environment & Energy Report, 12/30/19

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Resources for Resilience & Re-wilding

Jem Bendell Interview with Charles Eisenstein

Webinar hosted by Jem Bendell with guest Charles Eisenstein.

Further reading Charles Eisenstein – Wikipedia
Jem Bendell – Wikipedia

Eisenstein: “I’m not the guy who has got it all figured out. I know that my books and other work comes from a deep, inspired source, but that source is not me! It is more like I’m connecting to a field of knowledge, or to a story that wants to be told.

This knowledge is as much my teacher as it is anyone else’s. I’m kind of ordinary, compared to some of the amazing people I keep meeting. I’m just as much in the learning as anyone else, wandering as best I can toward ‘the more beautiful world my heart knows is possible’, encumbered by the programming and the wounds of our civilization.…”—”Q & A with Charles Eisenstein – Events,” Matthew Slater, Deep Adaptation Forum, 12/14/19

Charles Eisenstein is the author of “Climate, a New Story” and other books.

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There is an antidote to demagoguery
it’s called political rewilding

This form of radical trust devolves power away from top-down government, says Guardian columnist George Monbiot

You can blame Jeremy Corbyn for Boris Johnson, and Hillary Clinton for Donald Trump. You can blame the Indian challengers for Narendra Modi, the Brazilian opposition for Jair Bolsonaro, and left and centre parties in Australia, the Philippines, Hungary, Poland and Turkey for similar electoral disasters. Or you could recognise that what we are witnessing is a global phenomenon.…

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In 2014, Finland started a programme to counter fake news. The result is that Finns have been ranked the people most resistant to post-truth

Something has changed: not just in the UK and the US, but in many parts of the world. A new politics, funded by oligarchs, built on sophisticated cheating and provocative lies, using dark ads and conspiracy theories on social media, has perfected the art of persuading the poor to vote for the interests of the very rich. We must understand what we are facing, and the new strategies required to resist it.

If there is a formula for the new demagoguery, there must also be a formula for confronting and overturning it. I don’t yet have a complete answer, but I believe there are some strands we can draw together.…—”There is an antidote to demagoguery – it’s called political rewilding,” George Monbiot, The Guardian, 12/18/19

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Tribes Win KXL Order in Rosebud Sioux Tribe v. Trump

BOULDER, Colo. —  The Native American Rights Fund (NARF) announced on Friday, December 20, 2019, the organization and their clients, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the Fort Belknap Indian Community (the Tribes) received some great news from a Montana court. The federal court denied the United States federal government’s and the TransCanada’s (TC Energy) efforts to dismiss the Tribes’ case against the KXL Pipeline.

NARF Staff Attorney Natalie Landreth praised the decision, “The court’s decision means that ALL of the tribes’ claims on the current permits will proceed. The only claims dismissed are the ones that the Tribes conceded should be dismissed because they were based on an old permit. So this is a complete win for the tribes on the motions to dismiss. We look forward to holding the Trump Administration and TransCanada accountable to the Tribes and the applicable laws that must be followed.”…—”Tribes Win KXL Order in Rosebud Sioux Tribe v. Trump,” Native News Online Staff, Native News Online, 12/22/19

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On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’
In the ocean, it’s worse.

Tasmanian Aboriginals faced genocide, and now extreme climate change is threatening what’s left of their culture.

BRUNY ISLAND, Tasmania — Even before the ocean caught fever and reached temperatures no one had ever seen, Australia’s ancient giant kelp was cooked.

Further reading Australian bushfires: Hundreds of Millions of Animals Lost
No, koalas are not ‘functionally extinct’, but they are in trouble

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Fighting to save an endangered ape,
Indonesian activists fear for their lives

The Nasty Side of Hydropower: Fighting to save an endangered ape, Indonesian activists fear for their lives

Activists and academics have attempted to stop the construction of the Batang Toru hydropower plant in North Sumatra, which is currently being built in the sole known habitat of the Tapanuli Orangutan.

  • Critics of the dam have faced defamation charges, visits from intelligence officers, abrupt termination from conservation jobs and warnings that they could lose the right to work in Indonesia. One prominent opponent of the dam died in suspicious circumstances in October.
  • Activists in North Sumatra say they feel constantly under threat. Dam developer PT NSHE denies any efforts to silence or intimidate critics, saying the company is “always open to inputs and to collaborate with various stakeholders.”…—”Fighting to save an endangered ape, Indonesian activists fear for their lives,” Hans Nicholas Jong, Mongabay, 12/18/19

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Local Resilience Project
Building resilient communities is more important than ever
in the face of climate change
and other societal stresses

The Conversation is a reminder of the importance of meaningful conversations with family and friends about potential challenges to our resilience.talk with us…

The Local Resilience Project is a resource to help households understand the disruptive changes occurring in Earth’s systems and the existential threats these changes pose.

Resilience is a complex subject but the The Local Resilience Project offers the following pathway through:

  • The Conversation, to deepen your understanding of the threat and support you in the ‘difficult conversations’ about it.

The Checklist, 100 questions about daily life to assess your household’s current resilience.

The Call To Action, a progressive action plan to help you improve both your personal and community resilience.—Local Resilience Project

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A Russian Ice Cap Is Collapsing —It Could Be a Warning

A surge in glacial ice flow that created an “ice stream” is a concern for Greenland and Antarctica as well

High in the Russian Arctic, in the chilly waters straddling the Kara and Laptev, an 84-billion-ton island ice cap is projectile vomiting into the sea. Scientists say it could hold useful clues about what to expect as the world continues to warm.

The Vavilov Ice Cap, nestled in Russia’s Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, suddenly started to surge forward in 2013. This is not an uncommon event for glaciers — every so often, pressure will build up behind the ice and cause it to temporarily slip forward. These surge events can last anywhere from a few months to a year or more, and they’ll typically stabilize on their own. But in 2015 — two years after the surge started — the Vavilov Ice Cap was still going. By then, it was moving faster than ever, flowing forward at a rate of about 26 meters per day and dumping 4.5 billion tons of ice into the sea over the course of a single year.…—”A Russian Ice Cap Is Collapsing–It Could Be a Warning,” Chelsea Harvey, Scientific American|E&E News, 12/23/19

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How a closed-door meeting shows farmers
are waking up on climate change

Perdue, Vilsack and leading agricultural groups gathered in a Maryland barn to talk about the farm-country issue that dare not speak its name.

Even a year ago, such a meeting would have been improbable, if not impossible. But the long-held resistance to talking about climate change among largely conservative farmers and ranchers and the lobbying behemoths that represent them is starting to shift. The veil of secrecy attested to just how sensitive the topic remains, but over the course of the two-day gathering, the group coalesced around big ideas like the need to pay farmers to use their land to draw down carbon from the atmosphere, participants told POLITICO..…—”How a closed-door meeting shows farmers are waking up on climate change,” Helena Bottemiller Evich, POLITICO, 12/9/19

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The New Hope: Indigenous and Youth Voices
Rise for Climate Justice Despite Failure of COP25

While the theme of COP25 was “Time for Action”, world leaders failed to live up to this motto to address the climate emergency we are all facing. It is disappointing and enraging that instead of reaching an ambitious agreement to keep warming from reaching 1.5°C, world leaders debated false solutions and delayed action until COP26 in Glasgow next November. It is a confirmation that the true leadership is among civil society which is demanding and taking action for climate justice and for all of our collective future!…—”The New Hope: Indigenous and Youth Voices Rise for Climate Justice Despite Failure of COP25,” Leila Salazar-López, Amazon Watch, 12/21/19

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Researchers find leak in West Texas injection well

Click for full size view

FAR WEST TEXAS —After oil companies frack a well, federal and state regulations require the companies to pump any fracking wastewater deep underground into an “injection site” to prevent contamination. But new research suggests these sites could nonetheless be leaking into freshwater supplies.

In a recent study published in Scientific Reports|Nature, researchers at Southern Methodist University used radar imaging to study a wastewater injection site in the Ken Regan oilfield in Reeves County.…—”Researchers find leak in West Texas injection well,” Stephen Paulsen, Big Bend Sentinel, 12/18/19

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The Soil Story

It’s a story whose time has come

THE SOIL STORY is meant to be shared! On camera, in front of a room or through social media, we invite you to participate in the telling of a new global story about humans and how we can heal the planet. The Soil Story is designed to be to be the voice for a new movement of regeneration, it has been shared with teachers, students, makers, elected officials, artists, farmers, and now… you.—”The Soil Story – It’s a story whose time has come,” Kiss the Ground, Youtube, 11/27/15

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Deep adaptation, post-sustainability
and the possibility of societal collapse

A new paper by a long-time sustainability academic and consultant says that minor tweaks in our current system won’t help us.

We are likely headed for societal collapse and need a radical new way of thinking about the future. The first necessary casualty is hope–hope that we can keep things largely the way they are.

I write this piece primarily to get you to read an academic paper that has attracted relatively widespread attention. It is entitled “Deep Adaptation: A Map for Navigating Climate Tragedy.

It is remarkable in a number of aspects. First, it was written by a professor of sustainability leadership who has been heavily involved for a long time in helping organizations including governments, nonprofits and corporations to become more sustainable. Second, the author, Jem Bendell, has now concluded the following after an exhaustive review of the most up-to-date findings about climate change:  “inevitable collapse, probable catastrophe and possible extinction.” Third, his paper was rejected for publication not because it contained any errors of fact, but largely because it was too negative and thought to breed hopelessness.

It is important to understand what Bendell means by “collapse” in this context. He does not necessarily mean an event taking place in a relatively short period of time all over the world all at once. Rather, he means severe disruptions of our lives and societies to a degree than renders our current institutional arrangements largely irrelevant. He believes we won’t be able to respond to the scope of suffering and change by doing things the way we are doing them now with only a few reformist tweaks.

That this idea doesn’t go down well in sustainability circles should be no surprise. That’s because our current arrangements, even if “reformed” to take environmental imperatives into account, are in no way equal to the task ahead. Our existing institutions are structurally incapable of responding to what is coming and so consulting about how to reform them is largely a fool’s errand—not the way sustainability experts and consultants want to be thought of.

Instead, Bendell proposes a “post-sustainability” ethic. We must give up on the hope that our society can proceed largely on its current trajectory—with proper allowances, of course, for carbon emission reduction and climate change adaptation—and embrace what he calls “deep adaptation.” That agenda calls for resilience, relinquishment and restoration. The words themselves, especially “relinquishment,” convey something of the radical approach Bendell believes is now necessary. For details I implore you to read the paper.…—”Deep adaptation, post-sustainability and the possibility of societal collapse,” Kurt Cobb, Resilience, 3/17/19

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A Sacred Place And A Sacred Quest To Save It

The Oak Flat land in Arizona is holy to the Apaches. A mining company wants to blow a two-mile-wide hole in it.

Some of Wendsler Nosie Sr.’s earliest memories are set in Arizona’s Tonto National Forest. 

“I was about 3 or 4 years old,” the now 60-year-old Apache man recalls on a sparkling fall day, sitting beside his granddaughter at a picnic table under a tall oak tree. “We used to stop here at Oak Flat and my mother would pray.”

The Oak Flat area, which lies within the national forest, is sacred to the Apache people and central to the tribe’s origin story. For centuries before European settlers came, young girls gathered at this place ― called Chi’chil Bildagoteel in Apache ― for their coming-of-age ceremony. Apaches still visit in the spring to collect medicinal plants and in the fall to harvest Emery oak acorns, a protein-rich staple.

But if Resolution Copper, a subsidiary of international mining giants Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton, gets its way, a large part of the site will disappear forever, sinking into a hole two miles wide and deep enough to hold three Statues of Liberty stacked on top of one another.…—”A Sacred Place And A Sacred Quest To Save It,” Osha Gray Davidson, HuffPost, 12/27/19

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“Feral” by George Monbiot: a review

Philip Hoare is enchanted by a call for the return of bear, beaver and bison to Britain.

…The book justifies its subtitle with rhapsodic descriptions of forays into the natural world. Whether kayaking off the British coast or walking the Kenyan bush, Monbiot – who studied zoology at Oxford – focuses our minds on what we have lost, and what we stand to gain. Even more valuable are his comments on the desperate need for Marine Protection Zones around Britain, as championed by The Wildlife Trusts. And in his approval for Charles Clover’s excellent campaign against overfishing, Monbiot also looks to oceanic conservation on a grander scale.

In a brilliant chapter, “Rewilding the Sea”, he points out a surprising “by-product” of the great whales. By stirring the deep waters, they keep plankton at the surface, and fertilise the same organisms with their faeces, thereby increasing absorption of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. In pre-whaling days, their vastly bigger populations may have sequestered tens of millions of tonnes of CO2 per year. As if these animals weren’t beautiful enough, they could also do our dirty work for us: “Allowing whale numbers to recover could be seen as a benign form of geo-engineering.”

Meanwhile, Nature herself may pre-empt even our most ambitious plans. A scheme to reintroduce the grey whale to the Irish Sea (where it has been extinct for at least three centuries) by airlifting 50 from California seems to lurch into the realms of the absurd – only for the news to come in, as I write, that a grey whale has been seen off the Atlantic coast of Namibia – an amazing 5,000 miles from its Pacific home.…—”Feral by George Monbiot, review,” Philip Hoare, The Telegraph, 5/28/13

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Oceans running out of oxygen, say scientists

A warmer world means oceans are able to hold less dissolved oxygen, which is bad news for many fish.

Climate change and nutrient pollution are driving the oxygen from our oceans, and threatening many species of fish.

That’s the conclusion of the biggest study of its kind, undertaken by conservation group IUCN.

While nutrient run-off has been known for decades, researchers say that climate change is making the lack of oxygen worse. Around 700 ocean sites are now suffering from low oxygen, compared with 45 in the 1960s.…—”Climate change: Oceans running out of oxygen as temperatures rise,” Matt McGrath, BBC News, 12/7/19

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After climate change apocalypse,
kindness will be most important survival skill

A survival skills teacher says that in order to survive in post climate-change apocalypse, we’ll need empathy, generosity, and courage to survive. Kindness and fairness will be more valuable than any survival skill.

While I do not believe in “climate-change apocalypse,” per se (that’s a discussion I don’t have time or space to get into, here), what archaeologist and wilderness survival instructor Chris Begley describes here applies, as he points out, just about any imaginable apocalyptic scenario: “climate change, neoliberalism, authoritarianism, zombies, or a meteor.” He left out X-class solar flares, but yes!…The Anglophilic Anglican, 12/5/19

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Joanna Macy: Post-Doom Conversation

Joanna Macy: A Post-Doom Conversation,” Michael Dowd and Barbara Cecil, YouTube, 11/16/19

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It Is a Vast, Invisible Climate Menace.
We Made It Visible.

Immense amounts of methane are escaping from oil and gas sites nationwide, worsening global warming, even as the Trump administration weakens restrictions on offenders.

To the naked eye, there is nothing out of the ordinary at the DCP Pegasus gas processing plant in West Texas, one of the thousands of installations in the vast Permian Basin that have transformed America into the largest oil and gas producer in the world.

But a highly specialized camera sees what the human eye cannot: a major release of methane, the main component of natural gas and a potent greenhouse gas that is helping to warm the planet at an alarming rate.…—”It’s a Vast, Invisible Climate Menace. We Made It Visible.” Jonah M. Kessel, Hiroko Tabuchi, The New York Times, 12/12/19

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The global syndemic:
obesity, undernutrition, and climate change

Professor William Dietz (George Washington University) and Professor Boyd Swinburn (University of Auckland) co-chaired the 2019 Lancet Commission on Obesity. They explain how powerful vested interests and misplaced economic incentives are major drivers of the joint pandemics of obesity, undernutrition and climate change, and how we can tackle this global syndemic starting with grassroots action.—”The new Global Syndemic: how obesity, under-nutrition and climate change join up,” William Dietz, Boyd Swinburn,YouTube, 1/27/19

A new report by the Lancet Commission on the Global Syndemic of Obesity, Under-nutrition, and Climate Change delivers a powerful, incisive analysis of the drivers of those overlapping worldwide problems with some long-overdue and hard-hitting recommendations. The starting point is a recognition that malnutrition in all its forms is by far the biggest cause of ill-health globally, and that this is because we are in the midst of a “global syndemic”.

But what is a “syndemic”?

Obesity, under-nutrition, and climate change are distinct, massive global challenges. But they also overlap in time and space, interact with each other, and share common underlying drivers. Collectively, they represent a syndemic. (Originally coined as “synergistic epidemic,” the term was first applied to the interactions between different disease outbreaks. Here, the Commission has expanded its scope.)

Further reading: New Study Confirms: Degenerative Food & Farming System Poses Mortal Threat

This syndemic has thus far been notably hard to treat. The patchy progress is largely due to policy inertia and a lack of effective solutions, caused by inadequate political leadership and governance; strong opposition to policies by powerful commercial interests; and a lack of demand for policy action by the public.…—”The global syndemic of obesity, under-nutrition, and climate change,” Stuart Gillespie, International Food Policy Research Institute, 1/31/19

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Rewilding: as farmland and villages are abandoned, forests, wolves and bears are returning to Europe

Re-wilding is often thought of as a fantastical vision of the future. One day we might share the landscape with wolves and bears, but in the present day, it seems unlikely. For many people in Europe though, that’s exactly what they’ve been doing for at least the past decade.

Rewilding means bringing back the species and habitats which have disappeared from a region. Initially, conservationists imagined creating vast nature reserves which could be connected by “wildlife corridors” of forest, so that carnivores such as lynx could be reintroduced and thrive in a landscape that’s been heavily altered by humans.…”Re wilding: as farmland and villages are abandoned, forests, wolves and bears are returning to Europe,” José M. Rey Benayas, The Conversation,

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